3 minutes

Devices I use with IFTTT like a RF outlet, Broadlink RM Plus and a regular tv remoteYesterday I installed the new IFTTT app. Inside the app was an introduction to IFTTT pro with new features they should have implemented years earlier! First, I was really excited, but than I saw the subscription fee of 10 bucks per month! And after diving into the features for free users, I decided to completely throw IFTTT out of my smart home. Let me explain.

When I first learned about IFTTT in 2017/2018, it was a huge deal for how I was building my smart home. This platform allowed me to let devices communicate with each other, although they were not made to do so. IFTTT gave a solution with one trigger and one action, which was great for someone like me, who just got started with smart home technology. The best thing about it, it was free and very easy to use.

But no cloud service in this world can exist without paying the basic costs of maintenance, data, servers, ext… First, these costs were payed by the manufacturers of smart home gear, so that the users could use the platform for free. That’s how IFTTT survived the first 10 year of their existence. Now, they are introducing IFTTT Pro with a lot of extra features such as extra triggers and conditions in apllets and you can create as many applets as you like. The number of applets will be restricted to 3 for users who don’t want to pay for IFTTT Pro or they can use as many applets as they want built by the members of the IFTTT community.

In the last year, IFTTT proved unreliable due to some manufactures who decided to pull the plug on their IFTTT integration. First Google Nest, which disconnected their services from IFTTT in September 2019. Only 3 months ago, Tuya did the same, but luckily made up their minds after a short while and reappeared on the platform. (Thanks Paul! ) I really hoped that the events which made IFTTT unreliable were a thing of the past.

However, I was wrong. But this time, it is IFTTT that makes their own service unreliable by introducing IFTTT Pro and almost forcing all it’s users to pay an extreme high fee of 10 bucks per month by limiting the number of applets to 3 for free users. Just 3 applets… That’s almost nothing for someone who is building a smart home! It is true that you can choose your own price for the first year, but it has to be a minimum of $ 2. But considering the current situation, even 2 dollars doesn’t work for me. The alternative of using unlimited apllets created by the IFTTT community isn’t going to work for me. Not only because I am using a lot of customized webhooks, but also because creating your own automations is part of the fun while building a smart home.

What they should have done in my opinion, is save the extra features like conditions and extra triggers for IFTTT Pro, while keeping IFTTT Free the same as it always was. Just one trigger and one action and as many applets as I want. This way they don’t scare people away and still offer a premium service for those who really want or need it. I think that that is a much friendlier way to deal with your customers instead of forcing everyone to a premium plan by extremely limiting existing features.

I did reach out to IFTTT for a comment on my suggestion. You can read the tweets below.

My decision to leave the IFTTT platform is mainly based on the limited apllets for free users and the fact that I am not willing to pay an unexceptional high price for a service which proves itself unreliable twice in the last year. So, I am going to transfer my automations to Home Assistant and control them locally. Not because I don’t trust the cloud services anymore. I just want a have a smart home platform I can trust.

Luckily, there will be an update to the remote platform in the next version of Home Assistant, which was the main reason for me to use IFTTT. I only found 2 apllets which are vital to the way I control the do not disturb switch on my phone. That’s less than the limit of 3 for a free user. One thing is for sure, I am not going to pay for IFTTT Pro.